A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Access Control:

The protection of confidential material and data from unauthorized access and use.

Acoustic Pulse Recognition:

Similar to dispersive signal technology, acoustic pulse recognition utilizes two piezoelectric transducers located at positions on the screen to turn the mechanical energy of a touch vibration into an electrical signal.

Active Billboards:

Active billboards are another name for out-of-home OOH digital signage. These can be anything from a standard LCD panel mounted outside a building to a freestanding animated LED billboard by the side of the road.

Activation:

Refers to a buying decision motivated at the point-of-purchase by such factors as buying convenience, price, promotion, impulse selection, etc.

ActiveX:

A Microsoft software platform used on the web for enhancing interactive media control.

Ad Audience

:  Refers to the number and type of people exposed to the specific ad, with an opportunity to see.

Ad Exposure Frequency:

The number of separate ad exposures of an ad audience member during the venue visit, or other period.

Ad Exposure Time:

The number of seconds spent watching and listening to the ad.

Audience:

The people that will be exposed to the digital signage medium. Often targeted to a specific group.

AVI (Audio video interleaved):

A large file format for developing and viewing audio/video files.

B

Back channel:

A pathway where data can be pushed by a player back to the network manager or server.

Backdrop:

An area of color, usually a rectangle, that is seen behind a screen’s element.

Background

: It is a visually appealing environment where the message is displayed.

Bandwidth:

In video applications, the range of available frequencies that can be encoded and decoded as well as the signal-carrying capacity in a video path; measured in Hertz (Hz) or bits or bytes per second (bps/Bps).

Beacons:

Hardware that is small, battery-friendly, low-energy, Bluetooth connections that can transmit messages to smart phones or tablets.

Bit rate:

A way to effectively measure bandwidth. Bit rate is measured in bits per second.

BMP:

conversion script to created a picture into dots and pixels. It appears blocky when zoomed in.

Brand:

A simple, cohesive identity or consumer impression of a product, service or organization

Browser:

A software application used to access, retrieve, and present information on the world wide web. Can be used for accessing internal networks and files as well.

Buffering:

A way to compile data streaming over the web. Both traffic and bandwidth are determinants of buffering time length.

C

Cache:

A term for computer memory in a high-speed environment that stores web pages on a temporary basis so it can be more quickly accessed the next time it is visited.

Capacitive Touch Screen:

Capacitive touchscreen panels conduct a continuous current of electricity across the sensor using a coating of indium tin oxide.

Channel:

A specific, prescribed, or official course or means of communication. In regards to digital place-based, this refers to a particular network of venues.

Character Generator:

A program used to create text on video. In general, generators are used to make informational channels.

Clip:

Motion media term for portion of video

Cloud-based:

The software application that runs your digital signage display lives on the Internet instead of on your local computer, meaning you can access it as long as you have an Internet connection.

Codec:

A compressing software widget used to compress and decompress files, including digital video, in various compression formats.

Communications platform:

A system or collaboration of tools allowing organizations to utilize multiple communication capabilities, including voice, video and messaging, combined with  business process applications for streamlined internal interactions or interactions with customers.

Composite Video:

A video output signal that contains color, brightness and synchronization information.

Cookie:

A file, sent from a server, to a browsing computer.

Content:

Media, clips, text, video and audio that is presented by display and audio devices by a digital signage system.

Corporate Communications:

Communications supporting company initiatives, emergency preparedness, reinforce brand standards, employee training, introduce new products, employee/team recognition.

D

Database:

A collection of data on accounts which collectively comprise an information network.

Data Casting:

The broadcast of digital data information over a network of receivers and players.

Demand:

A desire for a product or service. A buying decision is based on brand identity and the impression based on previous purchases and experience of use.

Digital Advertising Networks:

Digital networks integrating targeted entertainment and/or information program content with advertising narrowcast through digital networks and/or screens in place based venues such as big box and small retail, transit, malls, grocery, health clubs, medical offices, gas stations, office buildings, hotels and other out of home consumer venues.

Digital Billboards & Displays:

Communicate advertising-only messages through screens equipped with LED (Light emitting diode) or LCD (Liquid crystal display) technology, often changing at predetermined times, or through motion recognition technology, to showcase multiple brands.

Digital display sign:

LCD, Plasma, TV or LED screens displaying digital content throughout a digital signage network.

Digital dynamic signage:

Digital dynamic signage is a term used to describe the emerging industry where flat panel devices such as plasma screens and liquid crystal displays are used as moving posters, electronic bulletin boards, and the like.

Digital Media:

Video, sound, pictures, and text that is downloaded or streamed over a WAN or LAN.

Digital menu boards:

LCD, Plasma, TV or LED screens that take the place of static menu boards in restaurant venues. Content is delivered to the menu board through a central content manager and changes are displayed to the menu dynamically based on the requirements of the venue.

Digital Out-of-Home:

Refers to signage that is displayed in public spaces by means of projector, LCD, Plasma screen, Electronic billboard, Isle-talkers, etc. Multimedia content is usually displayed using a computer, also referred to as a digital engine or media player.

Digital Sign:

A singular reference to a screen that is running digital signage content and typically replaces static billboards and posters.

Digital Signage:

A network of digital displays that is centrally managed and addressable for targeted information, entertainment, merchandising and advertising. Synonyms: Dynamic Signage, Digital Signs, Electronic Signage, Digital Media Advertising, Digital Signage Network, In-store TV Network, Captive Audience Network, Narrowcasting Network, Out-of-home Media Network, Digital Media Network, Advertising Network, etc.

Digital Signage Player:

A Digital Signage Player is the device at customer sites where Digital Signage Software accesses and displays digital signage information that it “receives” from the controlling server. Digital Signage Players automatically communicate with a primary server and in some cases; roll over to backup servers in the event of an interruption. The player may further assure consistency and uninterrupted signage presentation by preloading pages while others are being displayed.

Digital Signage Software:

Software that is standalone or Internet based that drives a digital signage system and digital sign.

Digital Signage Solutions:

A complete system with software, hardware, installation, training and sometimes even including content.

Digital signs:

Plasma display panels (PDPs), liquid crystal displays (LCDs), light emitting diode signs (LEDs), or traditional television (CRTs) being used like signage. That is, instead of tuning in a television station, they are showing specially prepared visual images to make them function like signs. This gives the operator of these signs the ability to update them quickly, and to use engaging content.

Digital transformation:

The use of technology to dramatically improve performance or exposure of an enterprise.

Display device:

CRT, flat panel LCD, plasma, aerial imaging, projector or other electronic devices that are at the end-point of a digital signage system, presenting the content.

Display mount:

The hardware used to hang up a display to present the information.

Dwell time:

The amount of time your audience has to see and process the content on your display.

E

Electronic Billboard

: Billboards that can be updated remotely via the internet.

Embedded Player:

A player for digital media that is embedded within a web browser to display media clips.

Employee Communications:

The sharing of information and ideas between the management of an organization and employees to align workforce to project objectives.

Ethernet:

A local-area network (LAN) architecture uses a bus or star topology and supports data transfer rates of 10 Mbps. A newer version of Ethernet, called 100Base-T (or Fast Ethernet), supports data transfer rates of 100 Mbps. And the newest version, Gigabit Ethernet supports data rates of 1 gigabit (1,000 megabits) per second.

ERP:

Enterprise resource planning

Eyes-On:

A new measurement for traditional Outdoor which reflects the probability that a person notices a billboard, and therefore, the advertising on it.

F

Firewall:

The part of a computer system or network that is designed to block unauthorized access and still allow outward communication.

Flat panel display:

Is a computer or television monitor that does not use cathode ray tube (CRT) technology, but commonly LCD or plasma technology. This allows the monitor to have a thin profile, light weight, small footprint and a flat screen, which is how the flat panel displays, gets its name.

Fly-on:

A type of file transition that brings in a file from outside the screen’s borders.

Frequency:

The part of a computer system or network that is designed to block unauthorized access and still allow outward communication.

Frequency distribution:

The percentage of respondents reached at each level of exposure to an advertising schedule.

FTP:

File transfer protocol, a standard protocol for data transfer over the internet.

G

Graphic:

A visual image or design.

GIF:

Bitmap image format for web graphics.

Gross Impressions:

Refers to the sum of exposures to a schedule of digital place-based network announcements.

GUI:

Graphical user interface is the user working environment within a software program.

H

HDMI:

Acronym for High-Definition Multimedia Interface, a digital connector interface that combines uncompressed high-definition video, multichannel audio, and intelligent format and command data in a single cable; with a bandwidth of up to 5 Gigabytes, it supports all HDTV standards.

HDTV:

Acronym for High-Definition Television, a display format for digital TV transmissions that boasts twice the number of scanning lines per frame (60 fps) than conventional Standard Definition TV (SDTV), as well as offering a much higher number of pixels and a wider aspect ratio.

HTML:

A internet document language code that tells the browser how to display text and graphics on the screen.

I

Interactive Displays:

Display device to control on-screen data through digital touchscreen interactions.

Internal Communications:

all processes and tools responsible for coordinated relay of information and collaboration among team member within a company.

Intranet:

Software used to link computers within an organization to build a private network  with a security layer that can only be accessed by that company’s employees or vendor collaborators. Intranets serve as a portal for employees in accessing internal and external sharable resources, enabling workers to communicate and collaborate for effective business outcomes.

Imagemap Information technology (IIT):

An interactive graphic image. When the graphic is clicked, another program launches.

IP Address:

Internet Protocol Address. A numerical label assigned to each device participating in a computer network and used for communication between devices and location addressing.

IP Multicast:

IP Multicast is a networking transmission protocol allowing multiple computers to simultaneously receive the same transmission.

IPTV:

Digital television service delivered via a broadband IP link using data communications wiring.

J

JAVA:

A programming language invented by Sun Microsystems. It is network-oriented and designed for writing programs that can be downloaded to your to your computer with small programs called “applets.”

Javascript:

A programming language that enables web pages to be designed with a higher level of interactivity.

JPG or JPEG:

A compression type for still image files.

K

Kerning:

An adjustment of the normal space distances between specific character combinations

kHz:

The abbreviation for kilohertz, or thousands of cycles per second.

Kiosk:

An electronic device that provides information (via a display), is interactive in nature (a multimedia combination), and allows for input (via an input device such as a touchscreen or a keyboard). The kiosk is unique from a standard PC as it is created for a specific user and specific purpose and is owned, controlled, and operated by the deployer.

L

LCD:

Acronym for liquid crystal display, a thin, flat-panel display device containing liquid crystal solution between two transparent electrodes and two polarizing filters; when electrically charged, the crystal molecules align in one direction or another in front of a light source, forming a pixel-rich, composite image.

LED:

Acronym for light emitting diode, a semiconductor diode that emits light when an electric current passes through it; in digital signage applications, clusters of red, green, and blue diodes are grouped together to form large panels, many of which are suitable for outdoor use.

Loop:

A repetition of a video clip or animation produced for continuous play.

M

Marquee:

A facade or canopy off the side of a building used to display some type of digital signage.

MP3:

A compression format used for audio which can be downloaded and used on either a computer or handheld MP3 player.

MPG or MPEG:

A standard for audio/video. There are three major MPEG standards: MPEG 1, MPEG 2, and MPEG 4.

Multichannel player:

Outputs multiple streams of unique content to multiple display devices.

Multimedia:

The integration of multiple forms of media including text, graphics, video, and audio.

N

Narrowcast:

Program content designed to reach a specific group defined by a particular demographic.

NTSC:

National Television Standards Committee

O

On Premise:

Physical location of hosted software platforms within a company.

Optical Imaging Touchscreen:

Optical imaging uses two or more sensors around the corner edges of the screen coupled with infrared backlights.

Out-of-home Video Advertising Bureau:

The official resource for information on out-of-home video advertising, marketing and metrics.

P

Playlist:

A schedule defining the order and duration of content to be displayed.

Playlog:

Record of information created from the digital signage system reflecting the content played, the system performance and other data.

Plug-in:

An extension of file capabilities within a pre-existing program that allows specific types of files to be read and utilized.

Portal:

A web site that serves as an entrance to other destinations accessible through the internet.

Push:

The sending of data without the client requesting it.

Q

Quick Response Code:

Is a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) first designed for the automotive industry. More recently, the system has become popular outside of the industry due to its fast readability and comparatively large storage capacity. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded can be made up of any kind of data.

Quicktime:

A software program that allows for play and view of multiple formats including: graphics, animation, text, music, and 360-degree virtual reality scenes.

R

RAM:

Hardware used inside of a computer for short term storage capabilities.

Realtime:

Live broadcast of events or the time an event actually takes place.

RGB:

Red, Green, and Blue. These combined colors are used to create an image on a computer screen or digital signage display.

Resolution:

Refers to the clarity and detail of an image relating to the number of lines (horizontal and vertical) of pixels; measured in dots per inch (dpi), with the higher pixel density the better.

S

S-Video:

Short for separate video, a video connection interface that carries luminance (Y) and chrominance (C) signaling separately to prevent color crosstalk and for improved image reproduction.

SaaS:

Is sometimes referred to as “on-demand software,” is a software delivery model in which software and its associated data are hosted centrally (typically in the (Internet/cloud) and are typically accessed by users using a thin client, normally using a web browser over the Internet. SaaS (Software as a service) has become a common delivery model for most business applications, including accounting, collaboration, customer relationship management (CRM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), invoicing, human resource management (HRM), content management (CM) and service desk management. SaaS has been incorporated into the strategy of all leading enterprise software companies.

SMIL:

Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) is a extensible Markup Language (XML) markup language to describe multimedia presentations. It defines markup for timing, layout, animations, visual transitions, and media embedding, among other things. SMIL allows presenting media items such as text, images, video, audio, links to other SMIL presentations, and files from multiple web servers. SMIL markup is written in XML, and has similarities to HTML.

Streaming:

Content delivered live over the Internet.

T

Template:

A pre-formatted file that allows creation of a new document or media file.

Triggered Content:

Media that can over-ride planned content when certain pre-determined conditions are realized such as the proximity of a shopper, removal of an item from display for examination or the reading of various inputs such as bar code, loyalty card, biometrics, etc.

U

URL:

A string of text that specifies the location of an object accessible through the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), typically a World Wide Web address, as of a home page or i-play channel. A Web URL (Universal Resource Locator) begins with “http://” or “https://”.

V

VBR:

A two-pass encoding that compresses a movie file to the most optimal data rate possible.

Vector Graphics:

Object oriented graphics that can be scaled without distortion

Video wall:

A wall mounted or frame-mounted checkerboard configuration of multiple video screens showing different images or the same image spread across multiple screens.

W

WAV:

Digital audio sound file extension (.wav)

Wayfinding:

Use of maps as directional aids in digital signage.

Webcast:

Movies, videos, or radio and television that is delivered on a live or delayed basis via the internet.

Workplace Communications:

all processes and tools responsible for coordinated relay of information and collaboration among team member within a company.

X

XML:

XML (Extensible Markup Language) is a standard data format used for text files and information in computer memory that allows easy data processing and exchange between different applications.

XSLT:

XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a standard subset language of XML designed to allow one XM

Y

YPbPr:

A set of video color spaces used to encode RGB information for Progressive Scan capable Component video connections; the analog version of YCbCr connection, contains the luma or brightness (Y) information along with the difference between blue and luma (Pb) and the difference between red and luma (Pr).

Z

Zip:

A data compression format that holds multiple compressed files in a directory. This allows for large software files to be sent more quickly and easily over the web.

Zone:

When creating your content, it is the screen areas created or that are provided on templates for different information to be placed.